campaign finance reform

And Over At the National Review...

Over at National Review Online, former intern and current Weekly Standard reporter Matthrew Continetti talks about his new book, The K Street Gang: The Rise and Fall of the Republican Machine, released today from Doubleday. We don't agree with him on campaign finance reform solutions...but we sure do agree with him on the need for them.

 

Continetti writes and talks about the culture of corruption in Washington:

 

What is free speech today?

Most of the criticism of any kind of campaign finance reform is that is somehow clamps down on free speech. In our current federal system of pay-to-play elections, incumbents can outraise challengers and easily outspend them in gerrymandered districts, and money speaks louder than people. Speech is not free as much as its bought.

 

House Passes "527" legislation

The House approved legislation last night that would put limits on individual contributions to tax- exempt 527 committees.  Individual contributions would be capped at $5,000 a year to committees engaged in federal elections and $25,000 to committees engaged in partisan voter registration.  Read the Washington Post story for the full scoop.

The Reform That Wasn't

David has a new article up at TomPaine.com on the Senate's latest "reform" bill - and just how ineffective it is. Check it out here.

Buried in the New York Times...

Buried deep in The New York Times story--21st paragraph, in fact--about the Senate approving lobbying legislation yesterday is the nugget of the story:
 

Sen. Feingold on the Daily Show

Last night Sen. Russ Feingold made an appearance on Comedy Central's the Daily Show with John Stewart. Towards the end of the interview Stewart asked Feingold about the campaign finance reform law he and Sen. McCain advocated for. Sen. Feingold said it's doing what intended but we need full public financing for all campaigns. Click here to watch the interview (1.5 MB Real Media file).

 

Here is the transcript:

 

Editorial today in Atlanta Journal Constitution

The Atlanta Journal Constitution writes that the only way to change the culture of corruption and enact meaningful reforms in Washington will be by sheer force via grass roots pressure.

L.A. Times Brownstein on Indian Gaming Money and Abramoff

The LA Time's Ronald Brownstein got it partly right when he wrote about the rush to return Indian gaming contributions in his column yesterday:

Oppose the "Make Congress More Corrupt" Bill

Rep. Bob Ney (R-OH) is at it again. Yesterday, he passed out of the Committee on House Administration, which he chairs, HR-1316 - the "Make Congress More Corrupt" Bill.