FEC

Millionaire's Decision

The Federal Election Commission (FEC) has agreed to hear arguments on the so-called "millionaire's amendment" to the Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act (BCRA, aka McCain-Feingold). The millionaire's amendment exempts candidates facing wealthy self-financing opponents from certain federal campaign contribution limits established in BCRA.

Cat's Away

Congress and President Bush have their horns locked over a questionable nominee to the Federal Election Commission. With barely a bicuspid remaining in the mostly toothless gums of the agency charged with overseeing campaign finance questions, complaints, and regulations the remaining commissioners are now playing Dear Abby, offering "informal views" on cases and requests. Excellent timing, no?

The Disclosure Window

The Federal Election Commission (FEC) may soon provide more detailed information on bundled donations by lobbyists. They're in the process of hammering out the details of new disclosure regulations the sticking points of which Shawn Zeller discusses in CQ Politics.

DeLay's ARMPAC under FEC investigation?

Tom DeLay's ARMPAC received an inquiry from the FEC on March, 8, 2006, asking them to clarify if they charged the "usual and normal" amount for the transfer of ARMPAC's mailing list to DeLay's congressional campaign committee. The campaign was charged $3,138.87 for the mailing list.

 

Seems like a small amount of money for this list, huh?

 

DeLay's Pre-Primary Report

Tom DeLay had to file his pre-primary fundraising and expenses with the FEC.

What do you see of note?

Here are some interesting notes:

No media expenses I can tell.

DeLay spent $92.01 for pest control on 2/8/06. I guess those cockroaches follow him everywhere, like homing pigeons.

He spent $3895 on rent in January and February. That seems very high.

McCain Rails Against FEC & Earmarking

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) says lobbying reform won't cure what ails Washington, as reported here in the Washington Times. McCain points his finger at a "corrupt" Federal Elections Commission and at the congressional practice of "earmarking" pork projects in federal legislation.

DeLay is PAC Man

Through the first three quarters of the year, indicted former Majority Leader Tom DeLay led all House members in the amount of PAC money he took, according to this analysis (pdf) from the Federal Elections Commission. He raised $920,207 from PACs.

"There's always a way..."

Jim Drinkard of USA Today reports on a conversation that indicted former Majority Leader Tom DeLay had with a Texas businessman in 1996, in which he advised him that there are "ways to get money moved around the system," and had an aide follow up with details.

The Fall of 2002

The Fall of 2002 must have been a busy time for Tom DeLay. Cruising to victory back home, DeLay was funnelling money to candidates around the country and around the state. He was at once trying to win Republican races through ARMPAC donations and expenditures in tight congressional contests, and to engineer a take-over of the Texas State Legislature. By all accounts, DeLay was successful.

DeLay Detritus: Wednesday News Round-up

Travis County D.A. Ronnie Earle told the Houston Chronicle that new information obtained over the weekend led to the most recent indictments against former Republican Majority Leader Tom DeLay.

Dick DeGuerin, DeLay's attorney, called Earle's statement "crazy," and accused the prosecutor of offering "a sweet deal" to DeLay's co-defendants to get them to testify against his client.