Presidential public financing

PRESS RELEASE: How Will Romney and Obama address our big money system?

Public Campaign Action Fund issued a press release today asking President Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney how they would address our big money-dominated political system.

From the press release:

The Chronicles of Money, Politics, and How the GOP House Will Stop at Nothing to Further Empower Special Interests

Here's a recap of Public Campaign and Public Campaign Action Fund's (PCAF) work from November 21 through December 2, 2011.

Gregg Harper Should Work to Improve--Not Eliminate--Presidential Public Financing

“you know, if it wasn't for special-interest groups coming to see us, we wouldn't have anything to do.”

That's a quote from Rep. Gregg Harper (R-Miss.) at the 2009 hearing on the Fair Elections Now Act, a bill that would bring a small-dollar matching system to Congress. Now Rep. Harper is leading an effort to eliminate the presidential public financing system.

Sen. McConnell's History of Opposition

Today, the U.S. House passed legislation to repeal the presidential financing system. As we noted this morning—it was a pure political stunt, further pushing our elections into the hands of an elite class of wealthy donors.

From Huffington Post: Which side are they on?

Public Campaign Action Fund's David Donnelly regularly posts on Huffington Post. Below is his piece today on efforts to repeal the presidential financing system:

Putting Special Interests First

This week, the House will take up legislation that would effectively kill the presidential public financing system, a reform created after the Watergate scandal in the 1970s.The system is broken, we all know that. The answer, though, is not to kill it--but to update it.

Really Big Money Politics

The New York Times editorializes on the need to fix the presidential public financing system and urges that a public financing system be created for Congress as well.

 

"Mr. Obama made much of a promise to fix it, once elected. So, the time has come to fix it.

 

Look at the facts

This morning, the Star Ledger in New Jersey editorialized about the presidential public financing system, saying it’s a ”struggling initiative” and is “buried and left for dead.” While the 1974-version of public financing might be dead, there’s increasing support at the state and federal level to fix the presidential system and enact Clean Elections-style full public financing.

Down, but not out

The news of Sen. Barack Obama's (D-Ill.) $150 million haul in September with an average donation under $100 combined with Obama's decision to opt out of the partial presidential public financing system gave political prognosticators and pundits the opportunity to declare the death of public financing. They signed the certificate and called the morgue.

 

FEC Gives McCain Pass

Well we have a decision from the FEC on whether Sen. John McCain broke the rules when abruptly backed out of the presidential public financing system for the primary race. In a widely anticipated move the six commissioners at the Federal Election Commission voted unanimously to sign off on McCain's opt-out.