reform

Weak

By a slim margin, the House narrowly agreed to a rule limiting amendments to a very weak and watered-down ethics and lobbying bill. Basically, House GOP leaders are trying to pass as little reform as they can get away with. Twelve Republicans joined all Democrats in opposing it. The final vote is scheduled for next Tuesday.

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Welcome! We've been working for months to build a better online resource to track money in politics issues and call attention to widespread corruption -and we're glad you're checking it out.

 

Looking around our website, you'll find plenty of reasons why we do the work we do - what about this issue is most important to you? What do you hope we can achieve?

 

Do you see what I see?

Don't forget the SOTU-DeLay...

Nobody Wants to Talk About the Elephant in the Room

This week has been a big one for lobby reform, with Congressional Republicans releasing their draft plans for lobbying reform and the Democrats following suit yesterday. Notably absent from all these proposals is any mention of public financing of elections, or, frankly, any mention of campaign finance reform at all. It's as if nobody wants to talk about the proverbial elephant in the room.

McCain Rails Against FEC & Earmarking

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) says lobbying reform won't cure what ails Washington, as reported here in the Washington Times. McCain points his finger at a "corrupt" Federal Elections Commission and at the congressional practice of "earmarking" pork projects in federal legislation.

Editorial today in Atlanta Journal Constitution

The Atlanta Journal Constitution writes that the only way to change the culture of corruption and enact meaningful reforms in Washington will be by sheer force via grass roots pressure.

Radio Alert!

I'm going on NPR's "To the Point" show, hosted by Warren Olney, today. The topic is lobbying reform. The guests include Rep. David Dreier (the House Rules Chairman who has been tapped by Speaker Hastert to manage the House Republican leadership's reform proposal), Jan Baran (former counsel to the RNC), and Larry Noble (executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics, and former counsel to the FEC). The show airs live from 2-3pm eastern (we're on from about 2:20-2:45); check your stations for local listings.

Stop That Train!

Three cheers for the Washington Post's Ruth Marcus, who definitely understands what's going on. In "Derail These Fundraisers," she puts her finger precisely on what is so corrupt about Washington's pay-to-play culture, and why real reform is needed, and could make a big difference.

L.A. Times Brownstein on Indian Gaming Money and Abramoff

The LA Time's Ronald Brownstein got it partly right when he wrote about the rush to return Indian gaming contributions in his column yesterday: