scandal

The Public Has Grown Weary

Jeffrey H. Birnbaum of The Washington Post published an analysis on the public's growing discontent of the coziness between big money lobbyists and our elected officials in Washington, DC. Birnbaum writes that corruption in Washington as a front page issue is cyclical (occurring roughly every 10 years) but the most recent scandals have driven the public’s distrust of Congress to a new low.

Judges for rent

"Hauled into court alongside Representative Tom DeLay, the Texas judicial system is also on trial," writes Ralph Blumenthal in today's New York Times. And it should be, since, as Craig McDonald, director of Texans for Public Justice, points out in the piece, "Judges in Texas swing the gavel with one hand and take money with the other."

But as big as Texas is, the problem is much bigger than just Texas.

With Friends Like These Part II

Philip Shenon reports in today's New York Times that investigations into alleged wrong-doing by scandalized lobbyist Jack Abramoff have turned up some interesting e-mails involving indicted former Majority Leader DeLay.

In 2002, it appears that DeLay put pressure on Abramoff to raise money for him through a private charity that the lobbyist controlled. The request led Abramoff to try to raise the money from Indian tribes that he represented.

"The criminalization of conservative politics"

The Houston Chronicle reports on a letter that indicted former Majority Leader Tom DeLay sent to constituents this week in which he angrily claims that Democrats are practicing "politics of personal destruction."

Citing the recent spate of scandals in the nation's captital, DeLay writes: "What we're fighting is so much larger than a single court case or a single district attorney in Travis County. We are witnessing the criminalization of conservative politics."

"There's always a way..."

Jim Drinkard of USA Today reports on a conversation that indicted former Majority Leader Tom DeLay had with a Texas businessman in 1996, in which he advised him that there are "ways to get money moved around the system," and had an aide follow up with details.

Special Interest Group Attempting to Taint DeLay Jury Pool

Public Campaign Action Fund Calls on Free Enterprise Fund to Pull Ads Immediately

Washington, DC – Public Campaign Action Fund, a non-partisan watchdog group, today called on the Free Enterprise Fund to immediately stop running television ads that amount to jury tampering.

What did it buy?

Just been thinking...

We're all focused on the $190,000 laundered by DeLay, his associates, TRMPAC and the RNC, and the elections it bought, and the redistricting it led to, and the five additional GOP seats to help DeLay increase his power... Ronnie Earle has indicted the fundraisers and the corporate donors for breaking laws and undermining the democratic electoral process.

But what about the favors these corporate contributors received from the Texas Legislature?

DeLay Detritus: Monday News Round-up

On TV...
Indicted former Republican Majority Leader Tom DeLay was busy over the weekend, defending his honor on Fox News Sunday, predicting this would "be over very, very soon," and spewing venom about a "vast left-wing conspriacy."

Republican Connecticut Congressman Chris Shays said on CNN's Late Edition yesterday that the GOP should not return DeLay to leadership.

Beyond Tom DeLay

There is no end of verbiage about Tom DeLay in today’s editorial pages, but while most of these pieces are good at making zingers about the House Majority Leader, none are calling for major reforms that would guard against future Tom DeLays taking power. The Los Angeles Times comes closest, noting that:

PCAF Statement on DeLay Indictment

STATEMENT BY DAVID DONNELLY, PUBLIC CAMPAIGN ACTION FUND ON DELAY INDICTMENT

Calls on DeLay to resign from Congress; Leaving leadership does not go far enough