Appointment of Dan Lungren as House Administration Chairman Raises Questions About New House Majority’s Commitment to Change

Lungren has called for ending all campaign contribution limits

Washington, D.C.—The decision to place Rep. Dan Lungren (R-Calif.) at the helm of the Committee on House Administration should please the wealthy special interest donors that just contributed and spent billions to elect their preferred candidates, said the nonpartisan campaign watchdog Public Campaign Action Fund.

“Rep. Dan Lungren said he wants an unfettered special interest system that allows a wealthy few to spend and contribute unlimited money to install favored politicians in Congress, just like we had during the Gilded Age of robber barons,” said David Donnelly, national campaigns director for Public Campaign Action Fund. “These extreme, out-of-touch views may make some entrenched politicians happy, but the vast majority of everyday Americans – Democrats, Republicans, and independents alike – want less corporate influence in politics, not more.”

The Committee on House Administration is the committee of jurisdiction for campaign finance legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives. Rep. Lungren, whose previous fundraising activities have been called into question, said as recently as September that there should be no limits on campaign spending. The last Republican chair of the committee was former Rep. Bob Ney (R-Ohio), who served 17 months in prison, partially because of his involvement in the Jack Abramoff scandal.

“If Lungren has his way, Big Oil, Wall Street, and insurance giants will call the shots even more than they do today in Washington,” said Donnelly. “Instead of giving the powerful elite even more influence, Congress should instead pass meaningful legislation that raises the voice of everyday Americans.”

Public Campaign Action Fund works to hold politicians who are against comprehensive campaign finance reform accountable for where they get their political donations. Learn more at www.campaignmoney.org.